Great Time for Authors to Shop for Promotional Supplies

Author Michelle Proulx’s cool bumper sticker.

CYBER MONDAY

Black Friday. Cyber Monday. It’s a great time to enjoy holiday savings.

But not just for t.v.’s, clothes, and gifts.

Authors can find great deals on promotional supplies, too.

It’s a great time to order bookmarks, posters, business cards—even domain names.

Look for great deals at Vista Print, for example.

Don’t get so busy shopping for gifts that you forget to look for great deals on author supplies.

I discovered author Michelle Proulx’s bumper sticker recently and thought it was pretty cool.

Michelle is currently running a successful IndieGoGo campaign, which includes this bookmark in the Swag Bag option.

http://michelleproulx.com/2014/11/29/perk-spotlight-imminent-danger-bumper-sticker

The featured book, Imminent Danger, is a great read. If you enjoy space opera, look for its re-release: It will be worth the wait.

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for the price of 2) now available for both Kindle and paperback

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Word Is Good Enough

Good Word

MICROSOFT WORD

If you’re self-publishing, Microsoft Word is good enough.

Whether you’re publishing a print-on-demand paperback through CreateSpace or an e-book through Kindle Direct Publishing, for example, it’s possible to create a well-formatted book using Microsoft Word.

Of course, it’s also possible to create a document that looks rather unprofessional, but that’s possible with any software. Word can produce excellent results, but it’s necessary to first learn how to make Word do this.

Some ‘experts’ like to advertise that Word isn’t good enough. There are a few simple explanations for this:

  • They may not be aware of all the little tricks that are possible in Word (like kerning and tracking, or how to prevent Word from compressing your images). Once somebody prefers different software over Word, there is no longer any incentive to master Word. So why should people who prefer other software become and remain up-to-date on all the little tricks that Word can do?
  • They may not be aware that each version of Microsoft Word has become more compatible with Kindle and CreateSpace, for example (partly from improvements in Word and partly from improvements from the publishing platforms). When Word 2007 first came out, .docx files led to formatting issues compared to .doc, but now .docx files from 2010 or 2013 in many cases work better than .doc files. Those who learned to prefer .doc in the early days may have not continued to test .docx over the years.
  • They may have an ulterior motive. Somebody who earns a living formatting books might want to advertise that Word is unsatisfactory. Some people may have a financial interest in another software program.
  • Authors or publishers who don’t use Word may wish to sell the brand that their books are better. A professional looking book does have better formatting, but all that matters is how it looks to the customer, not the process by which it was created. The truth is that if you master Word formatting, you can produce excellent formatting with it.
  • A couple of features are more convenient in other software programs, like creating different headers or page numbers in different sections. There is a straightforward way to do this in Word, but it just doesn’t seem straightforward until you learn how to do it. On the other hand, sometimes other tools that should be easy to use in other software programs don’t seem intuitive.
  • There are a couple of subtle improvements that can be made by using other software programs. For example, you can gain better control of images and you can work with em’s or percentages instead of pts in an e-book by working with HTML. If these subtleties are important to you, it doesn’t mean that you must work with different software. For example, you can save a Word file as a filtered webpage and then make these subtle improvements directly. Similarly, if you need a PDF file for your print-on-demand paperback, you can find a Word to PDF converter and print to PDF (using the convenient Save As PDF option leads to images with less than 200 DPI—but this is just one of several steps needed to avoid images with less than 300 DPI).

Microsoft Word doesn’t make formatting foolproof. For example, if you use tabs, your e-book could be a disaster (but if you simply learn how to use First Line Indent instead, and research other ways to produce good formatting—or avoid poor formatting—this won’t be a problem).

But it does provide a convenient method of formatting self-published books, and it can lead to good formatting for those who learn how to use it well.

There are many points in its favor:

  • fairly economical
  • very accessible
  • easy to get help (free tutorials from Microsoft, numerous online tutorials on Google, knowledgeable Word users on author community forums, etc.)
  • excellent formatting is possible (doesn’t matter that it was really designed as a word processor, it has grown to include the features needed to format a book quite well)
  • most features are very intuitive (and it’s easy to find helpful tutorials for anything that isn’t)
  • flexible for self-publishing as it serves as a great starting point for both print and e-book publishing
  • use of the built-in styles on the top of the Home ribbon make it easy to convert from print to e-book or vice-versa (those styles are also imperative if you want to achieve reliable e-book formatting from Word)

There are good alternatives to Word for those who prefer something else.

For print publishing, Adobe InDesign is considered by most to be top of the line. It’s not nearly as intuitive as Microsoft Word, but if you take the time to learn it, this will only be an issue for your first book. Serif Page Plus and Scribus are two other publishing software programs. Open Office is a free open-source alternative to Word.

There are a variety of alternatives for e-books, such as Jutoh, Atlantis, Calibre, and Sigil. Many of the alternatives are actually begun in Word using the styles and then improved with other software programs, even by some experts who are in the habit of faulting Word.

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for the price of 2) now available for both Kindle and paperback

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/29/word-is-good-enough/#comments

#Self-Publishing on #Amazon Boxed Set BLACK FRIDAY #Book Deal #AmazonCart

Self-Publishing Boxed Set

SELF-PUBLISHING with AMAZON

The paperback edition of my boxed set came out just in time for Black Friday.

So I set the introductory price at $19.99 (a $37 value—that’s what it costs to buy the 4 books separately). Get 4 self-publishing books for the price of 2. (It’s £13.50 in the UK.)

Really, it’s one 628-page paperback (not 4 separate paperbacks in a box), but it does have all 4 books put together.

It also includes bonus material from my blog.

The Kindle edition is currently priced at $7.99 (even less than the price of 2). It’s £4.84 in the UK.

Self-Publishing with Amazon (4 Books in 1) by Chris McMullen:

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for less than the price of 2) now available for Kindle

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/28/self-publishing-boxed-set-black-friday-book-deal/#comments

Give Thanks for Reading

Happy Thanksgiving. 🙂

ReadTuesday

ThankYou

THANK YOU

Ever read a great book? Be thankful for the author who spent years writing it.

That book grabbed your interest and entertained you. It may have communicated valuable knowledge. The story may have drawn you in. You may have fallen in love with the characters. Perhaps you became part of another world. It could be a better world, or a highly exciting world. An escape from reality. The story may have moved you.

The author may have spent years writing the book. Doing research. Learning and developing the skills needed to craft the masterpiece. Spending months searching for agents or publishers, writing query letters, or taking a huge risk by self-publishing. Marketing avidly, struggling to build a following, all to help you discover that great book.

So much time and effort perfecting a few hundred pages. All for your benefit.

This Thanksgiving, thank an author.

There are many…

View original post 487 more words

Amazon Is Attracting New Kindle Unlimited Customers This Holiday Season

Unlimited Reading

KINDLE UNLIMITED

When I visited Amazon’s home page today, there was a large advertisement to receive $40 off of a Kindle with a free six-month subscription to Kindle Unlimited.

That’s a compelling offer. It will surely create many new Kindle Unlimited customers.

It’s a temporary promotion, but it seems like a sign that Amazon may be working to bring more readers into Kindle Unlimited.

The readers will go where the authors are and the authors will go where the readers are.

Presently, there are 700,000 titles in Kindle Unlimited. It’s not all from KDP Select: There are about 100,000 books in Kindle Unlimited from smaller traditional publishers (including some popular titles, like Harry Potter).

If you love to read books, you can surely find worthwhile reads among those 100,000 titles from smaller traditional publishers or the 600,000 KDP Select titles.

There may be some indie authors pulling out of KDP Select because they aren’t happy with the $1.33 payout from October, 2014, but there are still many attractive authors and books in the program. No matter how many indies pull out, there are still 100,000 books from smaller traditional publishers (and those traditionally published books aren’t available through Amazon Prime).

The $1.33 also shows that the population of Kindle Unlimited customers is very large, considering that the KOLL Global Fund was $5,500,000.

Now Amazon is attracting new Kindle Unlimited customers this holiday season. The Kindle Unlimited readership will grow, and with free six-month subscriptions, many will use the program actively for half a year (and perhaps become hooked on it).

Here is another thing to consider: The more customers who subscribe to Kindle Unlimited, the fewer customers there are outside of Kindle Unlimited.

Authors must choose which side of the fence to stand on. It’s not an easy decision. I’m staying in KDP Select, as my sales have improved a little and my borrows are way up. Not every book is thriving in the program, but the potential is there.

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for less than the price of 2) now available for Kindle

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/amazon-is-attracting-new-kindle-unlimited-customers-this-holiday-season/#comments

Are You An Ethical Author..?

There is also an ethical author badge that you can display on your site (for those who adhere to the code, of course). This is a great step toward branding a positive image for authors.

Mandy Eve-Barnett's Official Blog

I came across a blog post referring to an ethical author code. This, I believe, is an excellent way to show your readers, potential publishers and fellow writers that you consider these principals to be correct and worthy of upholding. Displaying the logo will enable everyone reading your blog to be in no doubt of your responsibility to your craft and those who come into contact with you.

Will you adhere to the code?

Do you think it is a good idea, requires revision or unrealistic as a goal?

Ethical Author Code

Ethical author

Guiding principle: Putting the reader first

When I market my books, I put my readers first. This means that I don’t engage in any practices that have the effect of misleading the readers/buyers of my books. I behave professionally online and offline when it comes to the following practices in my writing life:

Courtesy

I behave with courtesy…

View original post 336 more words

Getting Squeezed (images on the new Author Central page at Amazon)

Squeezed

AUTHOR CENTRAL CHANGES

Have you checked out your Author Central page at Amazon recently?

The layout changed. (Well, every once in a while I see the old layout, but most of the time the new layout shows.)

If the new layout is showing, you’ll see a row of your cover images at the top, your blog or Twitter feeds below that, then your list of books.

You can view my page as an example, if you wish:

http://www.amazon.com/author/chrismcmullen

(Note the link above. Doesn’t that look better than http://www.amazon.com/Chris-McMullen/e/B002XH39DS? If you print your link on a bookmark, for example, the above format is simpler. The ‘secret’ is to log into Author Central, click Author Page, and follow the instructions where you see Author Page URL.)

Do you see the problem with the new author page layout? Every image is the same aspect ratio. Unfortunately, not all books have the same aspect ratio. So some book covers are getting squeezed at the top of the author page. You can really see it with my astronomy book above: The actual book cover is square, and so it appears noticeably distorted at the top of my author page.

In many ways, a wide image makes for an attractive thumbnail at Amazon, but not at the top of the new author page. Also, a narrower image works better for Kindle e-books when customers shop from a Paperwhite and other devices.

So what aspect ratio works best for the top of the author page? The ‘trick’ is to right-click an image and view the image info. I did this and learned that every image is scaled to 158px × 248px, which is an aspect ratio of 1:1.57. That’s pretty close to the Kindle Fire screen size, 1:1.6. In print, 5.5″ x 8.5″ and 5″ x 8″ are near enough matches, while 6″ x 9″ isn’t bad.

If you use 5″ x 7″, this will get squeezed a bit (since it’s 1:1.4). Large print books like 8″ x 10″ and 8.5″ x 11″ get squeezed significantly (these are less than 1:1.3). Square books, like 8.5″ x 8.5″ look quite distorted. If you have a landscape boxed set, that’s a disaster (unless the only text appears on sides of a box that don’t lie in the plane of the screen, then nobody can tell).

Does it really matter? Probably not too much. This is just an issue on the author page. It doesn’t affect the product page at all. Somebody has to click on your author profile from the product page just to get to your author page. Even then, it’s only the row of books at the top of the author page—the thumbnails that appear below are fine.

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for less than the price of 2) now available for Kindle

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/20/getting-squeezed-images-on-the-new-author-central-page-at-amazon/#comments

Can a GENIUS thrive in today’s self-publishing world?

Genius

GENIUS WRITERS

By genius, I don’t mean as measured by an IQ or any other kind of test.

I mean qualitatively, someone with an exceptional natural ability.

(Look up the word in a thorough dictionary and you might be surprised at some of the definitions of this word. I received a little vocabulary lesson.)

There are many different ways that one could be a genius writer.

  • There is one kind of genius who masters a particular writing style, and there are many different kinds of writing.
  • Then there is a genius storyteller.
  • There are geniuses when it comes to characterization.
  • Or the genius could be about content knowledge and the genius writer could be someone who is sharing that knowledge.
  • Or it may be a teacher who is a genius in terms of communication skills and instruction.
  • How about a genius in the visual arts who is creating an illustrated book?

My point is that there are many different ways that we could interpret what it means to be a genius writer. So let’s not restrict ourselves to any particular one.

FIT FOR TODAY’S WORLD?

I’d like to believe that a writing genius of any kind could and would thrive in today’s self-publishing world.

But I see pros and cons. And I imagine different kinds of writing geniuses, some of whom may be able to adapt better.

Obviously, any writing genius has a strength which serves as an obvious advantage. Whatever the writing genius excels at—be it writing, storytelling, content knowledge, communication, etc.—being exceptional at this is an obvious advantage.

But everybody, even those who excel at most of the things they try, has weaknesses. Everybody has something that could use improvement. In today’s publishing world, every little flaw gets exposed. But having an exceptional feature to offset the weaknesses still works to one’s advantage.

Many geniuses have quirks of some kind. The genius who strongly resists socializing has a disadvantage when it comes to marketing. The genius who can’t handle rejection well has a huge hurdle to cross when it comes to customer reviews. The genius who ignores something that may be important to readers, wishing only to focus on what he or she feels is important, may struggle to find an audience (but not necessarily—though this mentality could also extend into a complete neglect of marketing).

My feeling is that, in order to thrive in today’s self-publishing world, the writing genius needs to (A) recognize his or her weaknesses and be willing to improve them and (B) recognize his or her quirkiness and be willing work around it.

Then there is the issue of confidence versus humility. It’s easy for a genius to become accustomed to being right and therefore develop much confidence, which is one of the keys to success both in writing and marketing, but over-confidence can be quite detrimental.

Another issue lies in the communication skills. Suppose the genius has a huge vocabulary, a varied arsenal of language skills, and/or higher-level reasoning skills. The writer may be overmatched for writing toward a popular audience. This particular writer either needs to find a niche who appreciates the language and reasoning challenges, or work to deliver the language and reasoning at the right level for the intended audience. This can be a challenge.

Higher-level reasoning can be a major asset though, as it allows a storyteller to develop a complex plot that readers won’t easily predict.

Many geniuses do have a knack for a few keys to success. The following strengths may easily make up for other challenges.

  • Independence/leadership: It takes either independence or leadership (perhaps both) to successfully self-publish, and many geniuses excel at working independently. The leadership can help when one realizes that even a genius can’t do everything well, and self-publishing just has too many aspects to do it all perfectly. Here we return to the need to recognize one’s weaknesses.
  • Creativity: A creative genius can use this to produce masterful content (though novelty sometimes isn’t accepted), and creativity in marketing can sometimes help marketing stand out (it can also make the marketing more fun, better motivating you to market).
  • Motivation: When a writing genius chooses to write for his or her own reasons, he or she can exhibit amazing self-motivated diligence. This helps to focus on the project from the conception of the idea through all the stages of publishing and even into the marketing.

What do you think? Would a writing genius thrive in today’s market?

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for less than the price of 2) now available for Kindle

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

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https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/can-a-genius-thrive-in-todays-self-publishing-world/#comments

Anybody use Disqus?

Support 2

DISQUS

I read this fascinating and rather lengthy article about Amazon recently:

http://www.seattleweekly.com/home/955189-129/the-perks-pitfalls-and-paradoxes-of

I rather enjoyed reading the article, but it concluded with a negative note about the quality of self-publishing.

So I decided to leave a comment on this. (Not an easy comment to make, I felt, as there are people who feel strongly about it either way.)

The site prompted me to join Disqus to post my comment.

Then I began to wonder if anyone I know uses Disqus.

If so, what do you use it for?

Disqus gave me the option to find people I know, so once I know who uses it, perhaps I can search for you there.

(I’m not looking for votes on my comment, by the way. Just looking for whom to connect with.)

Copyright © 2014 (!) Chris McMullen

What’s Better than Freshly Pressed?

Artwork by Melissa Stevens at theillustratedauthor.net.

WORDPRESS

Being Freshly Pressed at WordPress is totally amazing. There isn’t much better than that. 🙂

I had a post featured on Freshly Pressed once. I made a poem entirely out of clichés (with a clichéd storyline) called “Once Upon a Time” in August, 2013, which was my most popular post ever. It had:

  • 345 Likes
  • 167 Comments
  • 1234 views in August, 2013
  • 298 views of that page on a single day
  • 320 more views in September, 2013
  • 73 more views of this page in October, 2013
  • A few views of that page every week even now (over a year later)
  • Dozens of reblogs, some pingbacks
  • 25 Facebook shares, 12 Twitter shares
  • Numerous follows during this period

That was my 15 minutes of ‘fame’ here at WordPress.

It’s pretty cool that numerous WordPress writers—including a nice variety—find themselves occasionally featured on Freshly Pressed. Everyone has a shot at it.

If you haven’t been featured yet, I hope you will be soon.

So what could be better than Freshly Pressed?

The day after my post was featured on Freshly Pressed, my website had a combined 432 views (298 were of that featured post).

At the time, I was hitting about 100 views per day. I remember thinking, “It would be so cool to hit 432 views all by myself,” i.e. without the help of Freshly Press.

My stats have always grown steadily, but slowly, yet when I was hitting 100 per day, 432 seemed totally unreachable.

A little over a year later, I’ve started to hit 300+ views regularly, and hit 400 a couple of times last month.

Then on November 16, 2014, the unthinkable happened: My site hit 580 views, for a new record.

Best Ever

This time, there was no help from Freshly Pressed. (But there was a nice boost from Australia. Down Under helped put me over the top.)

THANK YOU, THANK YOU to everyone who has supported my humble little blog. YOU are totally awesome. And if you’re familiar with my blog, then you know I really mean that. 🙂

May your new records be coming soon for you, too. (Actually, this is the season for most stats to grow.)

ONCE UPON A TIME

If you want to check out my little poem of clichés, you can find it here:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/once-upon-a-time

A few readers have told me that the comments were at least as enjoyable as the poem itself.

I actually have a sequel to that poem called “Beating a Dead Horse”:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2013/10/30/beating-a-dead-horse

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for less than the price of 2) now available for Kindle

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/17/whats-better-than-freshly-pressed/#comments