The Kindle Unlimited Rate Drops to Nearly $0.0040 per Page for July, 2017

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KINDLE UNLIMITED PER PAGE RATE FOR JULY, 2017

The per-page rate for Kindle Unlimited dropped down to $0.004034 per page for July, 2017 compared to the rate of $0.004223 per page for June, 2017.

This downward trend has now continued for several months.

  • $0.00497 for February
  • $0.0046 for March
  • $0.00457 for April
  • $0.00433 for May
  • $0.004223 for June
  • $0.004034 for July

The KENP per-page rate is at a current low. It dropped down to $0.00411 eighteen months back in January of 2016 (last year, not this one).

Back in January, 2016, the KENP idea was relatively new and there were many naysayers speculating that the rate would drop below $0.04 per page and never return.

However, it rose well above $0.004 in February, 2016, and continued soaring. While it has fluctuated a little here and there, it has held fairly steady, and approached nearly $0.005 earlier this year.

When it dropped to $0.0046 for March and April, it seemed to be returning to a more modest rate, as the $0.00497 was higher than usual.

When it dropped further to $0.0043 and $0.0042 for June and July, we hoped this might be a temporary downward fluctuation.

But here we come to $0.0040. The big question is: Will it finally drop below $0.0040 per page?

Of course, NOBODY KNOWS! (Well, maybe Jeff Bezos knows.)

We can hope we’ve reached the bottom of a valley, and that the rate will head back up. This happened in January of 2016.

But it’s common for the rate to drop in January for the holiday season, especially with a new version of Unlimited in place (which there was in 2016), and return upward starting in February.

We’re in August now, with the holiday season ahead of us. This is different.

However, there is another big factor involved. Amazon KDP just introduced KENPC v3.0. If you haven’t already done so, you should check the current KENPC’s of your books. You can check your current KENPC from your KDP bookshelf. Click the Promote and Advertise button next your title (or click the … button to find this option, if necessary), and scroll down.

If your KENPC happens to be longer than it had been, that will help compensate for the lower per-page rate. If your KENPC happens to be shorter now, the lower rate will hurt even more if it continues.

There is some good news, however. The KDP Select Global Fund for July, 2017 was $19M, which is a clear million dollars above the $18M payout for June, 2017.

This is part of an upward trend. It was $16.8M back in December, 2016, and $13.5M in December, 2015.

So while the per-page rate has dropped recently, overall Amazon KDP is paying even more in combined Kindle Unlimited royalties.

The problem is that we don’t know what will happen over the next few months. If you did, it would be easy to plan for it.

A couple of months may provide some helpful data, if you can wait.

Personally, I’m content with Kindle Unlimited (as both an author and a customer), but I’m just one author. My KENPC’s are about the same as they were, my pages read are holding fairly steady despite the tens of thousands of new books added to the market each month, I believe that Kindle Unlimited helps my sales indirectly, and I feel that I’m able to derive enough benefits from KDP Select to make it worthwhile for me. These are the things that each author must decide for him- or herself.

The Kindle Unlimited market, for which KDP Select authors see $19,000,000 per month in royalties on top of sales (and this is also on top of All-Star bonuses), draws a very significant indie audience.

However, I am very interested to see what happens to the per-page rate over the next few months.

Have you noticed any change with KENPC? How do you feel about Kindle Unlimited with regard to your books? Your feedback is welcomed and encouraged.

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

Click here to view my Goodreads author page.

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more
  • Kindle Formatting Magic (coming soon)

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

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Kindle Unlimited KENP Read for June, 2017

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KINDLE UNLIMITED PER PAGE RATE FOR JUNE, 2017

The per-page rate for KENP pages read for Kindle Unlimited was $0.004223 in June, 2017.

It’s only a couple percent less than the rate for May, 2017, which was $0.00433, but it’s a continued drop from April, 2017’s rate of $0.00457.

On the other hand, the KDP Select Global Fund for June, 2017 was $18M, which is a slight increase over May’s fund of $17.9M.

I don’t just look at the per-page rate only. I look at both numbers, the per-page rate and the KDP Select Global Fund.

The per-page rate goes up and down. When it happens to go down two months in a row, or when it approaches its relative low, it’s easy to panic (and I usually read discussions, comments, and articles of authors who do). But it usually goes up and down. Enjoy the highs, survive the lows. Focus on your current and future writing projects, keep marketing, and let these tasks keep your mind off the per-page rate when it hits a valley.

But even when the per-page rate drops or hits a valley, the KDP Select Global Fund has very steadily risen. Amazon just paid out $18,000,000 in royalties for June, 2017, and that’s ONLY considering pages read through Kindle Unlimited and Amazon Prime for KDP Select books. That figure doesn’t include traditionally published books like Harry Potter that are included in Kindle Unlimited, it doesn’t include All-Star Bonuses (I have contacted KDP about this very issue), and it doesn’t include royalties for sales. This is a huge amount of royalties for KDP Select authors to receive collectively each month:  That rate reaches over $200M annually.

The steady growth of the KDP Select Global Fund shows me that Kindle Unlimited continues to thrive, that there is a huge active market here. And many of these customers are indeed reading KDP Select books.

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen

Amazon Prime Day Deals Tuesday, July 11, 2017

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AMAZON PRIME DAY, 2017

Tuesday, July 11, 2017 marks Amazon Prime Day this year.

It’s like a summer Black Friday exclusive for Amazon Prime customers.

Check out the deals at Amazon.

It kind of snuck up on me this year. Is July 11 really here so soon? Wait: It’s already July? Didn’t the year just start? I guess that means I’ve been busy writing, which is a good thing.

There has been a banner on Amazon’s home page for a few days mentioning it, but Amazon really didn’t tap into the indie potential. I didn’t see mention of it in the KDP newsletter. Maybe the reason is that Amazon’s emphasis is on other products, but it seems that if they encouraged indie authors to schedule a Countdown Deal on Prime Day, or if they would discount more CreateSpace paperbacks on this day and let authors know about it (rather, CreateSpace paperbacks are more likely to be discounted on other days, it seems), well… surely those authors would really help to spread the word about Prime Day and be excited about it. Imagine the millions of authors who would like to feel “included” in the deal, even if they are small names, and would be excited to let their fans (even if in small numbers) know that they were somehow involved, if only they were directly involved and encouraged to participate. Multiply their fan bases by the huge number of indie authors (many of whom have actually developed great marketing skills), and it could be helpful advertising for Amazon.

I do love Amazon, and Amazon has been great for me as an author (and customer). I’m just thinking that if Amazon could see the potential here, they could make Prime Day even better.

BUT YOU CAN STILL TAKE ADVANTAGE OF PRIME DAY—EVEN IF YOU MISSED IT

So maybe you’re an author and you weren’t prepared for Amazon Prime Day.

Maybe you weren’t given a heads up. Maybe you didn’t put any of your books on sale.

Or maybe you did have a sale on Prime Day and it was a DUD, considering all the other great deals going on.

If so, it’s not too late to use Amazon Prime Day to YOUR advantage.

Put one of your books on sale AFTER Amazon Prime Day. That’s right: after.

Probably a Kindle e-book that isn’t already at its minimum possible price. That’s the easiest way for an indie author to put a book on sale.

When your sale starts, use your marketing to promote it something like this: “Missed Amazon Prime Day? Don’t worry, you can still catch a great deal.”

(You could do this after Black Friday, Cyber Monday, etc.)

Now your book is on sale, but not at the same time as the majority of other items, and not when customers are too busy on other deals to look for indie books.

Sales aren’t easy to come by, even with discounts. Marketing isn’t easy, even when you have a good idea.

But there is an opportunity here. It can be pulled off if done right.

Much of marketing is learned through experience. Come up with ideas, try to find out which of them suit you.

HAPPY PRIME DAY

Maybe you can find some good deals on something you’d like and save some $$$.

Good luck!

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

Click here to view my Goodreads author page.

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more
  • Kindle Formatting Magic (coming soon)

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

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Kindle Unlimited KENP Per Page Rate for May, 2017

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KINDLE UNLIMITED PER PAGE RATE FOR MAY, 2017

In May, 2017, the per-page rate for Kindle Unlimited KENP pages read dropped down a bit to $0.00433 from the value of $0.00457 for April, 2017.

It’s not the first time the per-page rate has dropped, though for quite some time it has held fairly steady, and not too long ago it peaked at about half a penny per page.

The rate is currently closer to $0.04 per page than it is to $0.05 per page, but that’s not the first time that it has ever flirted with $0.04 per page. In the past, when it dropped down to $0.04, it managed to work its way back up and hold it there for several months. (That doesn’t mean the same will necessarily happen again.)

The KDP Select Global Fund for May, 2017 was $17.9M, which is just a slight jump from the value of $17.8M for April, 2017.

This is a positive indicator. The Global Fund steadily rises. I remember when it was a “mere” $10M per month. Almost every month, Amazon pays out more royalties overall for Kindle Unlimited pages read. It’s a huge pool, and it’s growing. The challenge is much like paid sales: Getting customers interested in your book enough to read it (over the many other books on the market).

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen

How to Add URL Hyperlinks with the Kindle Kids Book Creator (KKBC)

INSERT A URL HYPERLINK WITH THE KINDLE KIDS BOOK CREATOR

The Kindle Kids’ Book Creator (KKBC) is Amazon KDP’s free self-publishing tool for creating illustrated children’s books from a PDF or from jpeg images.

The KKBC is easy to use, convenient, and is both PDF and JPEG friendly. It results in a fixed-format Kindle e-book, designed for picture friendly devices (and so the published e-book may not be available across all devices, but it will work on most devices for which it would be convenient to read an illustrated children’s book).

One of the main issues is how to add a clickable url hyperlink that will take the customer directly to an external website (such as your author page or blog).

There is a way to do it, but it may not seem obvious. The steps below will show you how.

HOW TO ADD A CLICKABLE URL HYPERLINK TO AN EXTERNAL WEBSITE WITH THE KKBC

Step 1. Add the text for the URL by inserting a textbox. Click the button on the toolbar called Add Text. Then type the text as you want it to show.

In my example, I typed the following text (see the picture of text below). This is the url for my Amazon author page, which shows all of my books.

(If you wish to do the same, login to Author Central, click the Author Page tab at the top, and read the instructions where it says Author Page URL.)

Step 2. Disable the pop-up feature for the textbox. Right-click in the textbox area and click the option to Delete Pop-up. This option preserves the text, but removes the pop-up feature that would otherwise be associated with the text that you added.

The pop-up feature needs to be disabled before you can make the hyperlink url clickable.

(If you run into trouble where you aren’t able to edit your text or you don’t see anything when you right-click, try closing the KKBC and restarting the computer. When you restart your computer and reopen the KKBC, try not opening other programs along with it.)

Step 3. Open a web browser and visit the webpage that you wish to link to. Copy/paste the full web address shown in your browser. When you do this, the copy/paste option should automatically include the http:// part that you need. Paste this url into a simple text editor like Notepad.

You can see the full url for my author page in the picture of text below. Compare it to the picture above. Notice how it automatically added the http:// part.

(Fancy text editors like Word sometimes include other stuff when you later need to copy/paste from Word, so it’s desirable to work with Notepad.)

Step 4. Prepare a simple line of HTML to paste into the KKBC. You don’t need to know anything about HTML. You just need to be able to follow these directions.

On a new line in Notepad (simply press Enter to begin a new line of text), type a line of HTML similar to my example in the picture of text below, except for using your own website url.

  • first type a less than symbol <
  • next write a href=”
  • (the quotation marks should be straight, not curly)
  • next copy/paste the full website URL for your webpage, including the http part (the same text from Step 3)
  • next close the quotation marks ” (straight, not curly)
  • next type a greater than symbol >
  • next type the URL text as you want it to look (the same text from Step 1)
  • next type a less than symbol <
  • next type /a
  • next type a greater than symbol >
  • when you’re finished, the text should look just like my example above, except for using your own website URL instead of my author page URL
  • it has the following structure

Step 5. In the KKBC, click the View tab and select HTML View.

Step 6. Click the HTML tab in the KKBC. It’s right next to the Design tab, just below the toolbar and above the view of your book’s content.

(You can only see the HTML tab after you’ve enabled HTML View in Step 5.)

Step 7. Find the text that you typed in Step 1 in the HTML code that you see. This is like the book, Where’s Waldo. You have to hunt for it.

It’s probably in a div id tag, and it’s probably towards the bottom. (If you’re about to give up, try copying and pasting the HTML text into a text editor and using the Find button to help figure out where that text is. Once you know where it is, you should be able to go back to the KKBC and find it in the HTML View.)

In the picture below, I used a RED ellipse to show where I found my text from Step 1.

(Make sure that you have the right page selected before you click the HTML tab. If not, you never would find it.)

Step 8. Once you find the text in Step 7 (identical to what you typed in Step 1), highlight exactly that text, no less and no more.

It’s very important that you highlight it perfectly. Don’t include the < or > signs, and don’t miss any characters from the text.

Step 9. Then copy/paste the text from Step 4 (the one line of HTML code that we made) to overwrite the text from Step 8.

That’s it. Except now you should make sure it works right. See Step 10.

If you’re able to zoom in on my picture below and if you’re able to find and read the text, it shows how my example looks after Step 9. (Note that I didn’t actually publish this book with the KKBC. I just used the KKBC to create a test file and to illustrate how to use this feature of the KKBC. I actually published this book with the Kindle Textbook Creator instead, and it doesn’t include any clickable links. But that’s another story. The test file that I created with my KKBC still works.)

Step 10. Click Book Preview and Create Book Preview. This may take a minute.

When it finishes, it should open the Kindle Previewer (which you need to install before you do Step 10, if you don’t already have this valuable tool installed — you can find Kindle Previewer v3 and other valuable tools at Amazon KDP right here: https://kdp.amazon.com/en_US/help/topic/A3IWA2TQYMZ5J6).

Find the page where you added the clickable hyperlink. Place your cursor over the hyperlink. The symbol of the cursor won’t change shape (it will be an arrow, not a hand), but that doesn’t matter.

When your cursor is over the clickable hyperlink, left-click your mouse once.

You can see how my example looks in the preview window below.

When I did this, my web browser opened my Amazon author page successfully.

You can see the webpage that opened below.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

Click here to view my Goodreads author page.

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more
  • Kindle Formatting Magic (coming soon)

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

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Kindle Unlimited KENP Pages Read for April, 2017

APRIL, 2017 KINDLE UNLIMITED PAGES READ RATE

The KENP per-page rate for Kindle Unlimited held steady in April, 2017.

The KENP per page rate for April, 2017 is $0.00457, which is nearly identical to the rate for March, 2017, which was $0.00460 per page.

The KDP Select Global Fund also held steady in April, 2017.

The Global Fund is $17.8M for April, 2017, which is slightly up from March, 2017, for which the Global Fund was $17.7M.

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen

Kindle Unlimited per-page Rate for March, 2017

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KINDLE UNLIMITED, MARCH, 2017

The KENP per-page rate for Kindle Unlimited dropped a little in March, 2017.

The rate per page is $0.0046 for March, 2017, which is down a little from $0.00497 for February, 2017.

The KDP Select Global Fund is $17.7M for March, 2017, which is up nearly $1M from $16.8M in February.

So although the KENP per-page rate took a slight dip, Amazon poured an extra $1M into Kindle Unlimited royalties compared to February.

This shows that many people are reading pages in Kindle Unlimited, and the program appears to continue to grow.

At this rate, Amazon will pay $200M in royalties just for Kindle Unlimited (and Amazon Prime) pages read for KDP Select books. That’s on top of royalties for sales, on top of the All-Star bonuses, and on top of whatever Amazon pays traditionally published books that participate in Kindle Unlimited (or Amazon Prime borrows, or both).

$200M shows that Kindle Unlimited is a significant market.

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen

Kindle Create: Amazon KDP’s New (Free) App to Convert from Word to Kindle

Curtains from ShutterStock. Kindle Formatting Magic cover designed by Melissa Stevens.

KINDLE CREATE

Amazon KDP launched a new free app called Kindle Create, which provides a simplified conversion process to format a Kindle e-book from Microsoft Word.

You can check it out here: https://kdp.amazon.com/help/topic/AIEDQZJ8TVWZX. Available for both Windows and Mac.

It’s not foolproof. And it won’t do everything that you can dream of. But if you’re looking for a simplified conversion process, and if your formatting isn’t too complex, this tool may be worth exploring.

If you visit the Kindle Create webpage, be sure to click the link called, “So how does it work?” You can find some important information there.

Although Amazon KDP has other free e-book creation apps (the Kids’ Kindle Book Creator, the Kindle Textbook Creator, and the Kindle Comic Creator), this new app (Kindle Create) is the first that would be appropriate for an e-book like a novel (or a nonfiction book with a few pictures).

I have a few notes and tips in case you decide to give Kindle Create a try:

  • Under “Beta Limitations,” it states that you may not be able to edit lists or tables. If these display fine in the previewer (for all devices), that’s okay. But if you decide you need to edit a list or table, you need to go back to Microsoft Word and start over with the Kindle formatting later. So if you have lists or tables, I would first open the file in the previewer to see if they format well enough for you in the previewer on all devices, and if so, I’d proofread those lists and tables to make sure that you’re 100% happy with them before you do anything with your file in Kindle Create.
  • Images are automatically placed as block images, and you can’t crop, reposition, or even delete them. So if you have any images, you want to be preview these right away and make sure that you’re content with them, or else go back to Word and get them right before proceeding with Kindle Create. If you decide you need to edit or delete an image, you have to go back to Word and then start all over with Kindle Create. (If you have a very rich file like a textbook, or if you have an illustrated children’s book, check out the Kindle Textbook Creator or the Kindle Kids’ Book Creator.) If an image displays larger than you would like, add padding to your image (add white space border around the picture for JPEG, or a transparent border for .GIF format) by doing this with image software of your choice (and then go back to Word and change out your image—before doing anything in Kindle Create). Most images you probably want to display large with no padding, but if you have a little logo and it displays much larger than you had in mind, you might pad that, for example.
  • Hyperlinks should be preserved, but can’t be edited. Test these out in Word first, then test them out in the previewer after loading in Kindle Create to make sure that you’re happy with the links before you do anything else in Kindle Create.
  • Upload a Word .docx or .doc file. (If you feel that PDF may be appropriate—it certainly is NOT if you have a novel—you should also try using the Kindle Kids’ Book Creator or Kindle Textbook Creator to see if they meet your needs better.)
  • Once your file is loaded (and you’ve approved or corrected your chapter titles), place your cursor in any paragraph. Once your cursor is positioned in a paragraph, you’ll see options on the right which are otherwise hidden. There are two tabs on the right panel. One tab is called Elements, and assigns paragraph styles for different types of paragraphs in your book. This is how Kindle Create simplifies the paragraph style process (which causes tons of confusion and leads to many e-book formatting mistakes when a Word file is directly uploaded to KDP). The other tab is called Formatting, which lets you create a modified paragraph style or format a portion of a paragraph (rather than the entire paragraph). If you want to format just a part of a paragraph (like making one sentence in bold), highlight the text and apply the formatting changes. To make a whole paragraph have a different formatting style than other paragraphs, first associate one of the preset styles with the paragraph (whichever you feel is the closest match), with your cursor already in the paragraph to begin with (but with nothing highlighted), and then apply formatting. It will change the name of the paragraph style to include a + sign (like Body+ instead of just Body). If you change your mind on the paragraph formatting changes, press the Clear button.
  • Kindle Create includes its own previewer. You may also wish to download the Kindle Previewer 3.0 that emulates books with enhanced typesetting. It’s available here: https://kdp.amazon.com/help/topic/A3IWA2TQYMZ5J6.
  • If you use Kindle Create, be sure to visit the Kindle Create page (https://kdp.amazon.com/help/topic/AIEDQZJ8TVWZX), click the Feedback link, and either complete the survey or email KDP (or both). If you would also share your experience in the comments section below, I would appreciate that (and so would other authors who visit my blog). If you want to mention the name of your book in your comment, you’re welcome to do so. 🙂

After I’ve played around with it enough times, I might post more information about Kindle Create in a future article on my blog. We’ll see.

AMAZON AUTHOR INSIGHTS

There are so many new features at Amazon.

Another of them is Amazon Author Insights: http://amazonauthorinsights.com.

You can find some helpful articles there from successful indie authors, experts, and even from Amazon. Check it out.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

Click here to view my Goodreads author page.

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more
  • Kindle Formatting Magic (coming soon)

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

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Kindle Unlimited KENP rate Nearly at Half a Penny per Page Again

KINDLE UNLIMITED, FEBRUARY, 2017

The per-page rate for Kindle Unlimited nearly returned to half a penny per page in February, 2017.

The KENP per-page rate is $0.00497, which actually rounds to half a center per page.

The rate is up a little from January’s rate of $0.004754.

The KDP Select Global Fund dropped from $17.8M in January to $16.8M in February, which returns it what it was back in December, 2016.

It’s typical for Kindle Unlimited to pay less per page (or going back further, per book) in January and for the rate to return somewhat in February, and it’s also typical for the Global Fund to see a peak in January, which it did again this year.

Through the end of 2017, the per-page rate finished strong, holding above half a penny per page for the last few months, and the Global Fund rose consistently throughout the year.

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen

Kindle Unlimited per-Page Rate for January, 2017

Image from ShutterStock.

Image from ShutterStock.

JANUARY, 2017 PER-PAGE RATE FOR KINDLE UNLIMITED

The KENP per-page rate for Kindle Unlimited dropped down to $0.004754 for the month of January, 2017.

But I’m not worried:

  • The per-page rate (and Prime borrows before that) generally take a noticeable dip in January. It’s not a surprise. (What’s a surprise is that it didn’t drop in December.)
  • The per-page rate in January, 2017 is much higher than it was in January, 2016.  It was at an all-time low of $0.00411 one year ago. Compared to the previous January, $0.004754 is sweet.
  • The per-page rate has been fairly consistent. It was over half a penny per page for a few months in a row, at a lengthy relative high, and before that, $0.004754 would have seemed like a good number. Again, it’s typical to see a drop in January, so I wouldn’t panic.
  • The KDP Select Global Fund hit a new high, climbing up to $17.8M for January (from $16.8M in December). It’s also typical to see the Global Fund rise in January. It’s a good sign: Amazon paid $1M more than usual, which shows that Kindle Unlimited is holding strong.

Copyright © 2017

Chris McMullen